Glossary of Printing Terms:M

M
  1. Thousand

  2. An abbreviation for magenta, one of the four process colors.

  3. Mega, which denotes 1,000,000.

M Weight

The weight of 1000 units.

Mac

Mac is a line of personal computers designed, developed, manufactured, and
marketed by Apple Computer.

Named after the McIntosh apple, the original Macintosh was released on January 24, 1984.

It was the first commercially successful personal computer to use a graphical user interface GUI and mouse instead of the then-standard command line interface.

The current range of Macintoshes varies from Apple’s entry level Mac mini desktop, to a mid-range server, the Xserve.

Macintosh systems are mainly targeted towards the home, education, and creative professional markets.

Production of the Macintosh is based upon a vertical integration model in that Apple facilitates all aspects of its hardware and creates its own operating system.

This is in contrast to PCs, where different brands of hardware run operating systems such as Microsoft Windows or Linux.

Machinable Mail

Any mail that can be placed through the U.S. Postal Service’’s automated mail processing system must meet certain requirements for size, weight and material before being classified as “machinable.”

Machine Coated

Paper that has the coating applied while on the paper machine at the paper mill.

Machine Direction

The direction parallel to the forward movement of material through the press.

Machine Finish

A pattern or finish applied to the paper while it is still on the papermaking machine.

Machine Glazed Paper

Paper that has one highly glossed side and one rough side.

Often used for posters.

Machine Proof

A proof used to check the result of the entire printing process.

It is the most complex control tool in the printing process; its greatest advantage is that it provides a realistic impression of the final product, independent of the preprint process.

Machine proofs come closest to the printed result when produced on the paper to be used for the print run.

Machine-Finished Paper

Paper stock that is given its surface gloss while still inside the paper machine, a process known as calendering.

Additional smoothness is sometimes achieved with supercalendering.

Macintosh

Macintosh is a line of personal computers designed, developed, manufactured, and
marketed by Apple Computer.

Named after the McIntosh apple, the original Macintosh was released on January 24, 1984.

It was the first commercially successful personal computer to use a graphical user interface (GUI) and mouse instead of the then-standard command line interface.

The current range of Macintoshes varies from Apple’s entry level Mac mini desktop, to a mid-range server, the Xserve.

Macintosh systems are mainly targeted towards the home, education, and creative professional markets.

Production of the Macintosh is based upon a vertical integration model in that Apple facilitates all aspects of its hardware and creates its own operating system.

This is in contrast to PCs, where different brands of hardware run operating systems such as Microsoft Windows or Linux.

Macro

A set of commands that can be invoked to perform a series of actions by hitting a single keystroke.

A macro generlly refers to instructions written in a command language rather than a programming language.

Macro Lens

A lens used for close up shots, generally below 24mm, that can be used to shoot subject matter that, at times will be only inches away from the lens.

MacTCP

Apple’’s network software that enables Macintoshes to connect to TCP/IP networks

Magenta

One of the three subtractive primary colors of the printing process. A shade of bluish-red also known as process red. Magenta is complementary to, or opposite of, the additive primary green. This is because magenta is formed when the additive primaries other than green (red and blue) are mixed together.

Magnapak

The term given by Heidelberger Druckmaschinen AG to a device used for inserting supplements into newspapers and magazines.

The unit can process up to 30,000 copies an hour and can insert up to 80 different products.

The Magnapak can insert and sort either in sequence or simultaneously, and has been designed without shafts for simple operation and minimal maintenance.

Magnetic Ink

Ink (or toner) that has had metal particles added to it so that characters printed with it, can be read by a scanning machine. Magnetic ink is used to print the bottom line on a check, which contains the account and routing numbers. See also MICR

Magnetic Ink Character Recognition

MICR

A technology used for printing text with magnetic ink or toner so that it can be read by a scanner. This technology is used mainly in the banking industry to encode checks with account and routing numbers.

Magnetic Printing Inks

Inks that react to magnetic fields and thus, with the help of suitable sensors, can be used for machine-based identification of labels and other similar applications.

Magnetic Read/Write Capability

The ability to record detailed information about picture-taking conditions, such as lighting and subject distance, via the magnetic layer on Advantix film.

Magnetography

A non-impact printing technique whereby an image is printed using a magnetic toner and magnetic fields on a drum.

Magnification

To increase the the actual size.

Mail Count

A mailing’’s total number of pieces that are dropped at a postal facility for delivery.

Mail Exchanger Record

MX Record

A type of resource record in the DNS specifying how Internet e-mail should be routed.

MX records point to the servers to send an e-mail to, and which ones it should be sent to first, by priority.

Mail Sorting

The process of arranging the mail pieces in a bulk mailing according to ZIP Codes to assist the postal service in processing the mail.

Mailbots

Software agents designed to perform specific electronic messaging functions on behalf of a user or application.

Mailbox Storage

A function of an e-mail network that stores the user’’s messages.

Maildate

The actual date, according to your postal certification, that the mail was delivered for mailing purposes to the USPS.

Mailers

A mailer is a product that is used to send transactional, informational or promotional data through the mail without the use of a traditional envelope. Mailers are generally produced as either self-mailers or continuous mailers. The self-mailer consists of a sheet of heavier weight stock that is folded to create a document suitable for mailing purposes. A continuous mailer is manufactured as a multiple part continuous form, collated together to create an outside envelope with internal inserts. The inserts may serve as order forms, statements, invoices, and return envelopes.

Mailing Statement

The document that must be filled in and provided with any mailing that is to be classified as bulk mail.

Mailshop

A company that specializes in personalizing, assembling and inserting the elements of a mail package. They will also address, sort, tag and deliver the mailing to the proper postal facility. Also referred to as lettershop.

Mainframe

A class of large and expensive computers that can manage a large number of users at once (several thousand). A mainframe is a “central” computer used for many tasks and can support many programs simultaneous. If super computers are at the top of the scale, then mainframes are at the next notch below them.

Majuscule

The historical terms for capital or upper-case letters.

Make up

A page’’s construction. The process of arranging type and graphics into their proper areas, using the layout as a guide; assembling type and art into finished pages.

Makeready
  1. The combination of activities that comprise the preparation of a printing press to print a job.

  2. One of the reasons that a conventional printing job can be so expensive to keep repeating is that the makeready process is very time consuming and, therefore expensive.

Obviously the shorter the print run, the larger the percentage of the price is attributable to the makeready process.

Something that designers and their clients often overlook.

  1. The process of setting up and adjusting a printing press for a particular ink, paper and specifications prior to printing.

This includes adjusting the infeed, grippers and guides, adjusting ink for proper coverage, registering copy, and matching the printed piece with the proof to be sure everything is correct.

  1. The paper used while making all the necessary adjustments before printing the actual run.

Also referred to as Set Up.

Making Order

A custom order placed with the mill for an item that has specifications that are different than a stock item. This is generally more expensive than ordering a stock item and may require a minimum order quantity.

Management Information Base

MIB

A repository designed to enable communications between network devices in open systems, in an OSI network.

Manifold

A term meaning “multiple parts” in the forms industry.

Manual Focus

Allows for the user to adjust the lens to create the desired sharpness for both the foreground and background of the subject matter.

Manuscript

The original text of an author’s work, handwritten or typed.

It can also refer to a book or document written before the invention of printing.

Manutius, Aldus (1449-1515)

One of the most prominent letterpress printers of the Italian Renaissance.

In 1493, Manutius founded a print shop in Venice and subsequently published a series of compact and inexpensive but nevertheless highly scientific works from classical Greek, Latin and Italian authors.

Around 1,000 copies of these “Aldines”, as they were known, were produced.

Map Paper

A cotton content paper used for printing charts, graphs and maps.

Is a durable paper with a high finish, has good printability, withstands folding, has a high opacity and often is water repellent, mildew proof and resists abrasion.

Marbled Paper

Colored paper with a veined, mottled, or swirling pattern, in imitation of marble, which is used with paper-covered boards and as end papers in books.

The use of marbled papers was especially popular during the Victorian era.

Margin
  1. The non printed areas around the image area of a page.

  2. The space between the edge of the page and the printed text. Sometimes in binding, the margins are trimmed or cropped.

Marginal Copy

Any copy printed in the margin areas of a page.

Marginal Punching

Evenly spaced holes that are punched into the left and right margins of a continuous form, used at the collator to guide the paper through and align each part. They are also used to guide the form through a continuous printer. Also referred to as pinfeed holes or lineholes.

Marginal Words

Word printed on each part of a multi-part form, generally printed in red iink and located at the top or bottom of the sheet. They are used for part to part designations, such as Original Copy, Duplicate Copy, and Triplicate Copy. They can also be used to make reference to the form they are printed on or to provide special instructions.

Margins

The free areas on a printed page between the edges of the text and the page edges.

According to the position on the page, it is possible to distinguish between head, foot and side margins and the central gutter.

When measuring the margin widths, ratios are often used. The gutter has a value of two and the other margin widths in the sequence head-side-foot are assigned values in relation to this.

Marketing to One

The use of digital technologies to combine data and marketing processes into a package that sends a personalized message about

Markup

Text and/or style edits to the draft of a document. The markup will give details on changes in formatting of the text, with indications of point sizes, typefaces/fonts, leading, etc. to be used.

Markup Language

The use of tags and attributes to identify the logical structure of a document on the World Wide Web.

Mask

1.Using an opaque material to block out an area of an image or negative to prevent light exposure in that area.

2.In colour separation photography, an intermediate photographic negative or positive used in colour correction.

Masking Material

A yellow or orange opaque paper or plastic material. The material is used to prevent light from exposing the non-image areas of a printing plate or film.

Masking Sheet

A flat sheet of yellow or orange opaque masking material used to assemble and position negatives for exposing plates. The material is used to prevent light from exposing the non-image areas of a printing plate or film. Also called goldenrod paper.

Master Page

A page that is used as a template or layout guide for all of the other pages in a publication.

Masthead

A list of business and staff information which is related to a publication and is usually found near the beginning of a periodical or on the editorial page of a newspaper. It also refers to the identifying logotype that appears at the top of the front page of a newspaper or newsletter.

Matching

The process of assembling a unique piece with the mail package that contains a matching unique piece. Such as a personalized letter having to be matched with the appropriately addressed envelope.

Matchprint

1.Color proof made from separation films. Photographic proof made from all color flats showing color quality as well as accuracy, layout and imposition before plates are made.

2.Kodak’’s negative or positive integral (single sheet) proofing system.

Material Safety Data Sheets

Written or printed sheets that contain information about the potential hazards of a chemical and the precaution and protection information to use for safety purposes.

Matrix
  1. The waste area of the facestock and adhesive that is removed from around the label after it is die cut. Also referred to as waste skeleton.

  2. The mold used for making type for letterpress or plates for flexography, also called mats.

Matrix or Multi-Zone Metering

A metering process, which electronically analyzes data regarding brightness, contrast, distance, and focus in order to adjust exposures to provide improved accuracy for color reproduction.

Matte Finish

A coated paper finish that is flat, not shiny like a gloss, but still keeps much of the ink from being absorbed by the paper and produces an excellent image.

Matte Paper

Paper with a matte finish. A matte paper is good for copy with a lot of text because the low gloss makes it easier to read.

Mattes

The copy for the preprinted pages of a letter, that have been produced on the same machine in which the personalized pages of the letter will be produced. This will guarantee that the preprinted pages will match the personalized pages.

MB

Megabyte

One million bytes

A unit of measurement equal to 1,024 kilobytes, or 1,048,576 bytes.

MBONE

Multicast backbone.

McLuhan, Marshall (1911-1980)

The Canadian literary scholar and communications theorist, whose work focuses on changes elicited in society by mass media.

McLuhan achieved fame with his book “Understanding Media: The Extensions of Man” (1964), in which he argues that modern electronic media will eventually turn human awareness and knowledge into an entity shared by all of society, just as electrotechnology has turned the human nervous system into a global network.

McLuhan taught at various universities throughout Canada and the USA. He coined the term “the global village”, which refers to the way the entire global community can be brought together by means of electronic communication.

Measure

In composition, it is thhe width of a line of type expressed in picas or points

Mechanical

Camera-ready paste-up boards with type, line art and crop marks mounted and ready for the process camera. They often contain a sheet of tracing or other semi-transparent paper attached with special instructions such as color information.

Mechanical Binding

A method of binding pre-trimmed leaves by the insertion of wire or plastic spirals through holes drilled along the binding edge.

Mechanical Pulp

A wood pulp that contains the natural wood impurities and has not been chemically processed. Also known as groundwood pulp.

Mechanical Separation

Separate mechanicals overlays for each color that is to be printed. The separations show proper registration for each color.

Media

The form of recording material used to store images, such as magnetic tape, magnetic disks, or flash memory.

Media Mix

Term used to describe combinations of different media such as television, radio, Internet, newspapers and magazines for marketing and promotional purposes.

The right mix is the one which best reaches the target audience.

Medium

A name for substances on which data is recorded, such as magnetic disks and tape.

Megabyte

MB

One million bytes.

A unit of measurement equal to 1,024 kilobytes, or 1,048,576 bytes.

Megapixel

A reference to an image with more than one million pixels.

Memory

A computer’’s internal storage.

Memory Keeper

Compact Kodak Advantix storage case that secures up to 12 film cassettes and accompanying photo file index prints.

Memory Stick

A memory storage device that is slightly smaller than a stick of gum and compatible only with Sony products. It is available in 16MB and 32MB capacities.

Menu

A list of available selections displayed on the computer screen.

Menu Driven

A system or program in which operations are directed by selecting choices on menus.

Merchant

A company that purchases a product directly from the mill or manufacturer and then resells it to the end user. Also referred to as a distributor.

Merchant’’s Brand

A name given to the paper that is a brand name owned by a merchant, converter or customer.

Merchant’s Brand

A name given to the paper that is a brand name owned by a merchant, converter or customer. Also referred to as private brand.

Merge

The process of combining several lists to make one list and then sorting, usually by ZIP Code.

Merge/Purge

The combining of two or more lists and then removing duplicate entries from the combined list of names.

Mergenthaler (1854-1899)

Inventor of the Linotype mechanical composition machine, which supplied complete lines of text cast in lead for letterpress printing.

Following an apprenticeship as a watchmaker, Mergenthaler emigrated to the U.S. in 1872 where, following many years of experimentation, he patented the Linotype as the first fully functional line composition machine, which would soon replace slow and laborious hand composition.

Metal Plates

Metal plates are usually made from aluminum and are coated with a number of different emulsions, depending on the type of printing equipment used and the type of jobs that are printed. They are most often used for large print runs, since the metal substrate lasts much longer than paper or polyester plates.

Metallic Ink

Printing inks which produce a gold, silver, or bronze effect.

Metallic Paper

Paper coated with a thin film containing metal or a thin film of plastic whose color and gloss simulate metal.

Metameric Colors

Colors that are affected by different lighting conditions, resulting in their hue appearing different under one lighting condition and then looking similar under another.

Metamerism

Phenomenon by which color samples with different spectra appear to match under a particular type of illuminant, although under other illuminants they show a color mismatch.

Metric System

A decimal system used by most countries to measure solids, liquids and distance.

Mezzotint

A screen made up of irregular shapes in random placement to produce an image.

MF

Machine finished

Any finish obtained on a papermaking machine.

It can refer to either the finish on the sheet as it leaves the last drying cylinder of the machine, or the finish given to a sheet by calendering online.

MFC

MFC, LWC, HWC, MWC, SC, ULWC

Standard international acronyms for weights and grades of papers used in rotary offset and letterpress printing.

Coated stock can be identified HWC (heavy-weight coated), MWC (medium-weight coated), LWC (lightweight coated), or ULWC (ultra-lightweight coated).

All are wood pulp-based, but available in many varieties. MFC (machine-finished coated) paper is made primarily from ground wood pulp, has a grammage of 48 to 80 gsm, and may be high volume.

LWC paper is particularly lightweight stock for use on rotary offset machines. SC (supercalendered) paper is an uncoated wood pulp stock based mainly on ground wood and recycled content.

It features an additional finish applied by a separate supercalender.

Mhz

Megahertz.

MIB

Management Information Base

A repository designed to enable communications between network devices in open systems, in an OSI network.

MICR

Magnetic Ink Character Recognition

A technology used for printing text with magnetic ink or toner so that it can be read by a scanner. This technology is used mainly

MICR Clear Band

On a check, a band 5/8 inch up from the aligning edge of a check. The band runs parallel to that edge and extends the full length of the check. The MICR number for the check is imprinted in this area on the face of the check. This area must be free of any other magnetic printing to prevent problems from occuring when the MICR number is scanned. Also referred to as check clear zone.

MICR Numbering

(Magnetic Image Character Recognition) a special encoded number used on checks and other documents that enable the document to be read by MICR scanning equipment for processing of information contained on the document.

Microfiche

Microfilm in the form of chips or cards, used for storage of printed material or graphics.

Microfilm

A small film containing a miniature photographic copy of printed materials and graphics.

Micrometer

An instrument used to determine thickness.

Micron

A unit of measure equal to one millionth of a meter or .00004”.

Microprint

Extremely small print that is only legible when highly magnified.

It is used as a security element on banknotes and other documents at risk of being forged.

The image resolution of color copiers and other similar machines is insufficient to reproduce microprint.

Microprinting

Microprinting is a line of text that is so small that it appears as a solid or screened line.

A low powered magnifying glass is needed to verify that it is text.

Mid Tones

The tonal range between highlights and shadows of a photograph or reproduction.

Mid-Roll Change

Feature available on the Kodak Advantix 5800 MRX-Zoom camera that enables users to remove a partially exposed film cassette, insert it again later, and start shooting exactly where they left off.

Middleware

Refers to software that connects two separate applications such as products that link a database to a Web server.

Midtone

The tonal values of an image that fall halfway between the highlight and shadow areas of the halftone, generally created by dots of 30% to 70% ink coverage. Also referred to as middle tones.

Mil

A unit of measure equal to one thousandth of an inch (0.001 inch).

Mill Brand

The brand name given to the paper by the paper manufacturer.

Mill Count

A term used to indicate that the sheet count of a shipment of paper was performed by the mill only. The merchant did not recount it.

Mill Cut

Indicates that the edge was cut by the machine slitter or cutters, opposed to being cut by the guillotine trimmer. The edge cut by the trimmer is smoother and more accurate.

Mill Direct

When the end user purchases paper directly from the mill.

Mill Edge

The edge of the paper that has been cut by the machine slitter. Generally the mill edge is slightly rough.

Mill Line

A line of related papers that is owned and named by the manufacturer.

Milli

The prefix of a unit of measurement representing a thousand parts.

MIME

Multipurpose Internet Mail Extensions

A protocol that allows a mail system to attach binary files such as spreadsheets, graphics, video and sound.

Mimeo Paper

Paper used on stencil type duplicating machines. It has a toothy, absorbent surface, ideal for this type of printing process.

Mini-Book

A term for books with covers no higher and wider than 7.6 centimeters (three inches).

One of the earliest known printed mini-books of the post-incunabula era is the book of hours produced by Lucantonio Giunta on May 4, 1506 in Venice.

The book was titled “Officium Beatae Mariae Virginis secundum consuetudine romane curie.”

It measures just 7.2 × 5.1 cm, was printed on parchment and contains illuminated, full-page woodcuts.

Mini-Lab

Photofinishing operation that operates on a retail level, serving consumers directly and processing film on-site.

Minimum Application Temperature

The lowest temperature at which a pressure sensitive label can be applied to a surface and maintain its initial adhesion strength.

Minuscule

The historical term for small or lower-case letters.

Mirror
  1. An exact copy of something. A common use of the term is “mirror sites”, referring to web sites or FTP sites that are exact copies of a site originating at another location. “Mirror sites” provide easier access to the resource.

  2. Simultaneously writting information to more than one hard disk at a time, preventing the lose of anything if one disk should fail.

Misbound

An illustration, map, or a number of pages that have been incorrectly folded, bound in the wrong place, or bound in upside down.

Misread

A condition that occurs when a reader’’s output data does not match with the encoded data.

Misregister

A problem in multiple color printing when the different color images do not line up properly as the successive colors are printed on the page.

MLOCR

Multiline Optical Character Reader

A machine that can read an entire address block and then translate it into a corresponding bar code. It then prints the bar code and sorts the mail to the appropriate stackers.

MMSI

h3.

Million square inches.

MMSQ

h3.

Million square millimeters.

Mock-up

A rough visual of how a finished document will appear.

MOD Numbering

MOD (Modulus) or check digit numbering involves the selection of a numbering method (MICR, Gothic, OCR, or Bar Code) to be used on documents for which an additional digit will be printed to the right of the base sequential number. Formulas are then used to verify the document sequence and information processing.

This digit enables the document owner to verify and control some aspects of the document, its contents, or the intended end use of the document. The digit can be used to assure the reliability of the numeric data entered, to make sure it matches the receiver of the materials listed on the document such as situations in which medications are issued.

Modem

MOdulator/DEModulator. A device that converts the digital data from a computer into an analog signal so that it can be transmitted over a telephone line. When it is received by the destination computer, the analog signal is converted back to digital data.

Modern Firsts

First editions of a book published in the 20th century.

Module

The narrowest bar or space found in a bar code.

Moiré Book Cloth

A book cloth having an irregular, wavy finish produced by embossing in such a manner as to resemble watered silk. Prayer books and Bibles sometimes have endpapers consisting of a folded sheet of black moiré cloth mounted on a paper flyleaf. Moiré book cloth was at one time used fairly frequently for doublures. It was also one of the earliest decorative effects applied to the calico used for publishers’ bindings

Moire Pattern

An undesirable pattern that may appear when two or more grid patterns overlap each other. The pattern may be due to improper screen alignment, incorrect screen angles being used or printing a screen over a halftone.

Moisture Content

The amount of moisture present and measurable in paper. The amount of moisture in a sheet of paper will vary according to the surrounding conditions and to the amount of moisture that is added during manufacturing and during the printing process. The moisture content of the paper can affect its runnability, printability and its physical strength. Generally, a range of 3% to 7% is average for the moisture content present in paper stock.

Moisture Resistance

The ability of a material to resist taking on moisture and breaking down when exposed to it.

Moistureproof

A property of a material that allows it to be unaffected or impaired by the exposure to moisture.

MoMA

The Museum of Modern Art

Founded in 1929 as an educational institution, The Museum of Modern Art is dedicated to being the foremost museum of modern art in the world.

Through the leadership of its trustees and staff, The Museum of Modern Art manifests this commitment by establishing, preserving, and documenting a permanent collection of the highest order that reflects the vitality, complexity, and unfolding patterns of modern and contemporary art; by presenting exhibitions and educational programs of unparalleled significance; by sustaining a library, archives, and conservation laboratory that are recognized as international centers of research; and by supporting scholarship and publications of preeminent intellectual merit.

Central to The Museum of Modern Art’s mission is the encouragement of an ever deeper understanding and enjoyment of modern and contemporary art by the diverse local, national, and international audiences that it serves.

Monochrome

Used to describe an image printed in a single ink color.

Montage

A single image built from combining several images.

Morocco

Leather made from goatskin with a characteristic grain pattern.

Straight-grained morocco was popular in the late 18th and early 19th centuries.

Mosaic

The first Web browser, available for the Macintosh, Windows, and UNIX, allowing the use the same interface. Mosaic contributed largely to the success of the Web.

Motion Picture Experts Group

A digital file format using compression to store movie files.

Motor Drive

A mechanism for advancing the film to the next frame and recocking the shutter, activated by an electric motor usually powered by batteries.

Popular for action-sequence photography and for recording images by remote control.

Mottle
  1. Spotty or speckled printing due to uneven ink absorption.

  2. Paper manufactured with a trace of heavily dyed fibers which are a different color than the paper. Also referred to as granite paper.

Mounted

Damaged leaves, illustrations, maps, and/or photographs that have been strengthened by backing with paper or thin cloth.

Also describes an illustration that has been Mounted, or Tipped, onto a blank page.

Mounting Board

A heavyweight paper board used for mounting artwork.

Moving Beam Scanner

A bar code scanner in which a moving light beam, rather than a stationary one, is used to scan and decode a bar code symbol.

MPA

Magazine Publishers of America

The industry association for consumer magazines. Established in 1919, the MPA represents more than 240 domestic publishing companies with approximately 1,400 titles, more than 80 international companies and more than 100 associate members.

Staffed by magazine industry specialists, the MPA is headquartered in New York City, with an office of government affairs in Washington, DC.

http://www.magazine.org/

MPEG

Motion Picture Experts Group

A digital file format using compression to store movie files.

MS

Manuscript

The original text of an author’s work, handwritten or typed.

It can also refer to a book or document written before the invention of printing.

MSDA

Material Safety Data Sheets

Written or printed sheets that contain information about the potential hazards of a chemical and the precaution and protection information to use for safety purposes.

MSI

Thousand square inches.

MSS

Manuscript

The original text of an author’s work, handwritten or typed.

It can also refer to a book or document written before the invention of printing.

Mullen Test

A test used to measure the bursting strength of paper. Also referred to as pop test.

Mullen Tester

A device invented by the American engineer John Mullen to test the bursting strength of paper.

Multi-Buyer

The file of duplicates which have been found from two or more lists having gone through the merge/purge process. The duplicates file contains the names of consumers who have made more than o

Multi-Domain

The ability of an Internet server to host more than one domain.

Multi-part Forms

A form that consists of two or more parts, designed so that printing on the top part transfers an image to the lower parts by use of carbon inbetween parts or by the use of carbonless paper.

Multi-user

A computer system designed to be used by more than one user at one time.

Multifunction

All-in-one

A printer that has additional features, such as scanning or faxing.

The most common form is a printer/scanner/copier.

Multiline Optical Character Reader

MLOCR

A machine that can read an entire address block and then translate it into a corresponding bar code. It then prints the bar code and sorts the mail to the appropriate stackers.

Multilith Master

A paper plater that is used on a small offset printing press.

Multimedia

Term used for media products and services which are saved, transmitted and depicted electronically.

Important features of multimedia include the combination of static (text and image) and dynamic (audio, animation and video) elements and the interactivity of its content.

In order to use multimedia, it must be possible to transmit data between the content location and the user in both directions.

Video components involve large quantities of data which require correspondingly high transmission rates.

Multimedia Messaging

Electronic messaging that contains various data types such as text, audio, video, animation, graphics, 3-D images, etc.

Multimedia Networking

The ability to transmit multimedia data types over traditional and emerging data communications paths.

Multiple Up

Refers to the printing of two or more pages of data on the same side of a sheet of paper, for example, 2-up, 3-up or 4 up.

Multiprocessing

The execution of multiple programs by two or more cooperating CPUs at the same time.

Multipurpose Internet Mail Extensions

MIME

A protocol that allows a mail system to attach binary files such as spreadsheets, graphics, video and sound.

Multitasking

Performing more than one task at a time, such as running two or more computer programs at the same time.

Murray-Davies Formula

Equation to calculate the optical area coverage or the total reflection factor from the combined values of printed and non-printed areas./r/n/r/nThe tone values in a densitometer are defined in accordance with this equation.

MuseDoma

Museum Domain Management Association

The Museum Domain Management Association was created in 2000 by ICOM and the J. Paul Getty Trust.

MuseDoma is the sponsoring organization for the .museum top-level domain, which uses a wildcard DNS record for unregistered *.museum domains.

Museum Domain Management Association

MuseDoma

The Museum Domain Management Association was created in 2000 by ICOM and the J. Paul Getty Trust.

MuseDoma is the sponsoring organization for the .museum top-level domain, which uses a wildcard DNS record for unregistered *.museum domains.

Museum of Modern Art

MoMA

Founded in 1929 as an educational institution, The Museum of Modern Art is dedicated to being the foremost museum of modern art in the world.

Through the leadership of its trustees and staff, The Museum of Modern Art manifests this commitment by establishing, preserving, and documenting a permanent collection of the highest order that reflects the vitality, complexity, and unfolding patterns of modern and contemporary art; by presenting exhibitions and educational programs of unparalleled significance; by sustaining a library, archives, and conservation laboratory that are recognized as international centers of research; and by supporting scholarship and publications of preeminent intellectual merit.

Central to The Museum of Modern Art’s mission is the encouragement of an ever deeper understanding and enjoyment of modern and contemporary art by the diverse local, national, and international audiences that it serves.

MWC

MWC, MFC, LWC, HWC, SC, ULWC

Standard international acronyms for weights and grades of papers used in rotary offset and letterpress printing.

Coated stock can be identified HWC (heavy-weight coated), MWC (medium-weight coated), LWC (lightweight coated), or ULWC (ultra-lightweight coated).

All are wood pulp-based, but available in many varieties. MFC (machine-finished coated) paper is made primarily from ground wood pulp, has a grammage of 48 to 80 gsm, and may be high volume.

LWC paper is particularly lightweight stock for use on rotary offset machines. SC (supercalendered) paper is an uncoated wood pulp stock based mainly on ground wood and recycled content.

It features an additional finish applied by a separate supercalender.

MX Record

Mail Exchanger Record

A type of resource record in the DNS specifying how Internet e-mail should be routed.

MX records point to the servers to send an e-mail to, and which ones it should be sent to first, by priority.

Mylar

A stable polyester film used as a base for film mounting or a grid for mounting perforating and scoring rules.

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212.619.5446 • Email • 212.883.8088
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629 Grove Street, Jersey City, NJ 07310
Open Monday - Friday: 9:30AM - 4:00PM
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