Glossary of Printing Terms:W

W3

World Wide Web

A virtual world formed by Internet HTTP servers containing richly formatted pages that can be downloaded upon request to browsers such as Safari, Firefox and Microsoft Internet Explorer.

It was created at CERN in 1994.

WWW documents are marked up with HTML, an SGML application

W3C

World Wide Web Consortium

They are the group that oversees Web development ideas keeping them in conformance with the standards.

WAF

With All Faults

A description used mostly by auctioneers and booksellers to describe books that are suspected of being imperfect.

The term is used to warn the buyer that the item may not be returned for any reason.

It is, in other words, sold “As Is.”

WAIS

Wide Area Information Server

Software that permits searching, with keywords and phrases, huge Internet indexes.

Wallet Flap Envelope

An envelope that has diagonal seams and is available in standard business envelope sizes.

It has a square flap which extends down about half the size of the envelope.

The seal flap also has extra gum protection.

WAN

Wide Area Network

A network or intranet connecting multiple locations outside of a single building or company location.

Wand Scanner

A hand-held, pen like wand used as a contact bar code scanner.

Warning Bands

A border printed on the document that indicates the security features being used on the document.

Sometimes the warning band will also explain how to detect certain features.

Warped

Refers to condition; the boards or paperback covers are bent and twisted.

Wash Up

The cleaning of an ink unit on a press to get it ready to change to a different color.

Washed

When a map, print, or pages of a book are cleaned in a mild chemical solution to remove stains, writing, or acid from the pages.

See also Re-Sized.

Waste

Incorrectly printed pages and other paper generated in print shops such as damaged paper, trial runs when setting up presses, packaging materials and various other print products and book returns.

Waste Paper

Paper and paperboard disposed of as industrial, commercial and household waste, and sent back to the papermaking company for recycling.

Water Fugitive Ink

When water fugitive ink comes in contact with water or any aqueous type of solution, it will run and stain the document.

Water-Based Coating

Coatings manufactured on the basis of water that dry relatively quickly, are odor-free and do not yellow.

Water-based coatings are mainly applied using coating units, though in some cases they are also applied using a press inking unit.

The layer thickness of the coating can reach 3 mm. Water-based coatings are not as glossy as UV coatings.

Waterless Printing

A printing process where a fountain solution is not necessary.

The non-image areas of the plate have been treated with silicone to prevent inking in those areas.

Watermark

Designs on sheets of paper created by varying paper thickness.

A real watermark occurs when the dandy roll displaces (light watermark) or concentrates (shaded watermark) the pulp mass in the wire section of the paper machine.

Facsimile, or impressed, watermarks are made in the paper web after it has left the wire section.

Imitation watermarks are added off machine by means of a transparent varnish or embossing process.

Translucent letters or a design in a sheet of paper. Usually can be seen only by holding the sheet to the light.

Watermark – Artificial

Artificial watermarks are applied after the paper has been manufactured.

They simulate a true watermark but are only visible on the side that the watermark is applied.

They can be applied by the paper manufacturer or by the forms manufacturer.

Watermark – True

A translucent image created in the paper on the paper machine, with the use of a dandy roller.

The image is generally the name of the paper or a company logo and can be viewed from both sides of the paper. Also referred to as a genuine watermark.

WAV

A type of file that has audio content.

Wax Pick

A process that measures the ability of inks to pick fibers or particles from the surface of paper as a manner of testing the surface strength of paper stocks.

Web
  1. A computer network made up of Internet protocols and hypertext pages.

It is a system of hypertext documents that can be retrieved and viewed by anyone who has access to the internet.

  1. Web is also used to refer to a roll of paper used on a web-fed press.
Web Crawler

A software program designed to search the Web for a specific purpose such as to find a listing of all of the URLs within a particular site.

Web Paper

Roll paper used for printing on a web press.

Web Press

A printing press that prints on a large, continuous roll of paper as opposed to printing on sheets.

Web Server
  1. Software that receives the requests from the client and then retrieves the requested information and sends it back to the client.

  2. File server that contains the Web HTML software and other applications used to form the Web site(s).

Web Services

The interfaces that are becoming industry standards for connecting dissimilar Web applications.

Interfaces such as SOAP, UDDI and other types of protocols have been developed to replace custom programmed API’’s that previously enabled applications to jointly communicate and share data.

Web Services Description Language

WSDL

The specifications, including interface and implementation-specific details about Web services and their owners, that are published to a UDDI (Universal Description Discovery, and Integration) directory.

It uses XML to describe details such as data types, deployment details, interface, protocols and location.

Web Services Flow Language

WSFL

A developing standard, created by IBM, used to outline reliances and interactions between Web Services.

It is a way of defining workflow to meet business objectives.

Web Site

A website or Web Site is a collection of web pages, typically common to a particular domain name or subdomain on the World Wide Web on the Internet.

A web page is a document, typically written in HTML, that is almost always accessible via HTTP, a protocol that transfers information from the website’s server to display in the user’s web browser.

All publicly accessible websites are seen as constituting a mammoth “World Wide Web” of information.

The pages of a website will be accessed from a common root URL called the homepage, and usually reside on the same physical server.

The URLs of the pages organize them into a hierarchy, although the hyperlinks between them control how the reader perceives the overall structure and how the traffic flows between the different parts of the sites.

Web-Based Distributed Authoring And Versioning

WebDAV

Draft standard RFC 2518, “HTTP Extensions for Distributed Authoring”, produced by the IETF (Internet Engineering Task Force).

WebDAV extends the HTTP (Hypertext Transfer Protocol) Internet protocol in such a way that the content of documents can be accessed directly via the Internet to allow a team to work on the content and structure of a document.

For example, the WebDAV technique allows partners in the printing and media industry to access a PDF document simultaneously and apply correction instructions to it.

WebDAV

Web-Based Distributed Authoring And Versioning

Draft standard RFC 2518, “HTTP Extensions for Distributed Authoring”, produced by the IETF (Internet Engineering Task Force).

WebDAV extends the HTTP (Hypertext Transfer Protocol) Internet protocol in such a way that the content of documents can be accessed directly via the Internet to allow a team to work on the content and structure of a document.

For example, the WebDAV technique allows partners in the printing and media industry to access a PDF document simultaneously and apply correction instructions to it.

WebMaster

A webmaster is a person responsible for designing, developing, marketing, or maintaining Web site(s).

The webmaster of a Web site may also be called a system administrator, the author of a site, or the Web site administrator.

Weight
  1. The thickness of the strokes of the characters in a particular font.

The font could be described as light, normal, or bold.

  1. The weight or thickness of paper stock as determined by the weight in lbs. of a ream (500 sheets) of the paper of a specified size.
Wet Strength

The ability of paper to maintain a percentage of its tensile strength when it has been saturated with water.

It possess properties that are resistant to rupturing and disintegrating. When a paper is saturated with water, it has wet st

Wet-on-Dry Printing

Multi-color print process, in which the first color is allowed to dry before the next is printed; used for color printing on a single color press.

Wet-on-Wet Printing

Multi-color printing-press, in which subsequent colors are printed before the previous have dried.

White Balance

Light coming through the lens of a digital camera needs to be balanced in order to achieve natural or accurate coloration.

Proper white balance is achieved by extracting white light from the light that comes through the lens, adjusting for the ambient lighting.

White Point

The brightest neutral area of an image, according to which all other areas are adjusted.

Whiteness
  1. The intensity of white of a paper stock.

  2. The paper’’s ability to reflect all colors of light the same.

WHOIS

WHOIS is a TCP-based query/response protocol which is widely used for querying a database in order to determine the owner of a domain name, an IP address, or an autonomous system number on the Internet.

Wicking

The bleeding of ink from the ink jet printing process into unwanted areas of the paper, causing a blurring effect of the printed character or image.

Wide Angle Lens
  1. A lens with a short focal length, generally between 24mm and 45mm, allowing for more expanse to be imaged within a short distance.

  2. A lens that has a shorter focal length and a wider field of view (includes more subject area) than a normal lens.

Wide Area Information Servers

WAIS

Software that permits searching, with keywords and phrases, huge Internet indexes.

Wide Area Network

WAN

A network or intranet connecting multiple locations outside of a single building or company location.

Widow

When the last line of a paragraph falls on a the first line of new page or column, that single line is called a widow.

A single word is on a line by itself at the end of a paragraph is also called a widow..

Width

On continuous forms it is the dimension parallel to the cross perfs between forms.

On snap out forms it is the dimension parallel to the stub perf.

Wildcard

A special symbol used to represent one or more characters.

Used in pattern matching in searching for text, files and directories.

For example, as supported in Windows and DOS, an asterisk is a wildcard that stands for any letter combination.

Window

A die cut opening in an envelope intended for the delivery address, return address or other informatiom to show through from a piece inside the envelope.

Window Envelopes

An envelope with a die cut opening that is intended to have information show through from the piece inside the envelope.

Windows

A computer operating system developed by Microsoft. Versions include Windows 95, Windows 98 and Windows NT.

WIPO

The World Intellectual Property Organization

A specialized agency of the United Nations. It is dedicated to developing a balanced and accessible international intellectual property (IP) system, which rewards creativity, stimulates innovation and contributes to economic development while safeguarding the public interest.

WIPO was established by the WIPO Convention in 1967 with a mandate from its Member States to promote the protection of IP throughout the world through cooperation among states and in collaboration with other international organizations. Its headquarters are in Geneva, Switzerland.

Intellectual property refers to creations of the mind: inventions, literary and artistic works, and symbols, names, images, and designs used in commerce.

For more information visit WIPO

Wire Coil

An inexpensive type of binding material used to make a spine on a spiralbound book.

Also known as Wire Comb.

Wire Comb

An inexpensive type of binding material used to make a spine on a spiralbound book.

Also known as Wire Coil.

Wire Side

In papermaking, it is the side of the paper next to the wire on the paper machine.

The under side of the paper.

Wire Stitching

Most commonly known as either saddle stitching or side wire stitching.

With the Grain

Parallel to the grain direction of the paper.

Wood Engraving

The oldest method of producing printing forms.

The base material is a block of hard wood.

Various cutting tools are used to cut out the parts of a pre-sketched image which are to appear clear or uninked.

The parts which remain produce the image.

The earliest known woodcuts for reproduction on paper date from the sixth century AD in China.

The Buxheim Christopherus of 1423 is the oldest dated woodcut in Europe.

It is believed that playing cards were printed using woodcuts in the 14th century in Europe.

An illustration made from a highly polished block of wood.

Also known as Wood Cut.

Wood-Free Paper

A somewhat misleading term for paper free of mechanical pulp with a woody fiber content of five percent (by weight) or less.

Woodcut

The oldest method of producing printing forms.

The base material is a block of hard wood.

Various cutting tools are used to cut out the parts of a pre-sketched image which are to appear clear or uninked.

The parts which remain produce the image.

The earliest known woodcuts for reproduction on paper date from the sixth century AD in China.

The Buxheim Christopherus of 1423 is the oldest dated woodcut in Europe.

It is believed that playing cards were printed using woodcuts in the 14th century in Europe.

An illustration made from a highly polished block of wood.

Also known as Wood Engraving.

Word Spacing

The space in between words.

Work and Tumble

A printing method where different pages are assembled so that they are on one plate.

One side is printed and the sheet is turned from front to rear so that you are using the opposite edge as the gripper edge and then the second side is printed.

The product is then cut apart to make two finished items.

Work and Turn

A printing method where different pages are assembled so that they are on one plate.

One side is printed and then the sheet is turned over so that you are using the same gripper edge and then the second side is printed.

The product is then cut apart to make two finished items.

Work Group

When a group of users can share the same resources to work on a project simultaneously.

Work Reading

An image that reads backwards in comparison to the original.

Workflow

A computer-aided process for organizing work sequences by systematically moving documents from one stage of the operation to the next; requires transport of data and files within a network.

Workflow Management

Control of work processes in computer networks and those of other functional devices; all activities necessary to run and manage computer and network-based production units within a graphic arts production environment.

World Wide Web

WWW

A virtual world formed by Internet HTTP servers containing richly formatted pages that can be downloaded upon request to browsers such as Safari, Firefox and Microsoft Internet Explorer.

It was created at CERN in 1994.

WWW documents are marked up with HTML, an SGML application

Worm

A type of malicious software that damages a computer or network.

WORM

Write Once, Read Many

Refers to a storage device, typically an optical disk, that can only be written to once.

After that the data is permanently available to be accessed an unlimited number of times.

Wove Finish

A standard smooth even finish.

Wove Paper

Paper with a wove finish.

One of the most common papers used for general printing.

A paper that has been made on a fine-mesh mold which, when held to the light, shows no marks or lines.

It has been the typical paper used in bookbinding since the early 19th century.

Wrap Around Cover

A heavy weight cover used on snap out forms, which starts at the back of the binding stub and wraps all the way around the length of the form and back up to the binding stub perforation in the front.

The front part of the cover is used to insert in between forms in the book so that the when writing on a form, the image does not transfer through to the next forms.

Wrap Around Label

When a label is wrapped around a container and the tail end of the label overlaps and adheres to the lead edge.

Wrappers

A book with a paper cover.

A book with a printed or plain paper binding.

Sir Allen Lane, founder of Penguin books, was credited with inventing the modern paperback when he published Ariel by Andre Maurois with a paper cover in 1936.

Also known as Paperback .

Also known as Wraps.

Wraps

A book with a paper cover.

A book with a printed or plain paper binding.

Sir Allen Lane, founder of Penguin books, was credited with inventing the modern paperback when he published Ariel by Andre Maurois with a paper cover in 1936.

Also known as Paperback .

Also known as Wrappers.

Write Once, Read Many

WORM

Refers to a storage device, typically an optical disk, that the computer can write only once, but thereafter read any number of times.

Write Test

A dummy form constructed of the same paper and carbon or carbonless paper that will be used on the end product.

It is then tested for impressioning by imprinting it on the equipment that will be used or by handwriting on it if it is a handwritten form.

Write Through

The transfer of an image from the original through to the other parts of the form by the use of pressure.

Writing Paper

Paper that has a surface that is easy to write on with pen or pencil.

Writing Papers

White or color paper stocks that can either be wood based or wood-free

Wrong Reading Image

A mirrored image, the image appears backwards.

WSDL

Web Services Description Language

The specifications, including interface and implementation-specific details about Web services and their owners, that are published to a UDDI (Universal Description Discovery, and Integration) directory.

It uses XML to describe details such as data types, deployment details, interface, protocols and location.

WSFL

Web Services Flow Language

A developing standard, created by IBM, used to outline reliances and interactions between Web Services.

It is a way of defining workflow to meet business objectives.

WWW

World Wide Web

A virtual world formed by Internet HTTP servers containing richly formatted pages that can be downloaded upon request to browsers such as Safari, Firefox and Microsoft Internet Explorer.

It was created at CERN in 1994.

WWW documents are marked up with HTML, an SGML application

WYSIWYG

“What you see is what you get.”

Abbreviation for “What you see is what you get”, a word processing functionality necessary for working with desktop-publishing systems that allows the user to produce text as it will be printed or displayed.


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